Mar 15, 2010

News from The Guatemala Scholars Network

1. INFORMAL GSN GET TOGETHER AT MERIDA MEETINGS?

2. CALL FOR HELP WITH OBTAINING KIDNEY MEDICATIONS FOR AN ORPHAN IN JOCOTENANGO

3. DETAILS ON IMMIGRATION WORKSHOP AY SFAA/SLACA MEETINGS IN MERIDA

4. EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED ON DISABLED IN GUATEMALA

5. KAQCHIQUEL SUMMER LANGUAGE PROGRAM IN ANTIGUA

6. SUMMER FIELDSCHOOL IN XELA

7. LOTS OF NEW AND IMPORTANT PUBLICATIONS FROM F&G



1. IF YOU ARE GOING TO THE UPCOMING SFAA AND SLACA MEETINGS AT MERIDA AND WOULD LIKE TO TIP A GLASS WITH A FEW FELLOW GSN’ERS, DROP ME A LINE AND I’LL SEE IF WE CAN ARRANGE SOMETHING--- Tom



2. CALL FOR HELP WITH OBTAINING KIDNEY MEDICATIONS FOR AN ORPHAN IN JOCOTENANGO


I write to you all now in dire need. Last month one of our patojos, Leyton, was admitted to the hospital for Chronic Kidney Disease/renal failure. Leyton went from "stage one" renal failure to "stage five" (complete failure) almost over night. Leyton was admitted to the hospital, underwent surgery to put in a catheter and received x-rays and other tests. For an eleven year old, this can only be nothing short of terrifying. But what happened this Friday might make me (and maybe you) think otherwise.
This past Friday the volunteers of Los Patojos planned a grand fiesta for the all the patojos: piñatas, face painting, sugar, games, sugar, dancing and fun. And sugar. Unexpectedly, Juan Pablo sat down the entire school (try doing that to a 100+ kids on Fiesta Friday) and explained that Leyton is waiting outside to visit. Of course everyone, volunteers, staff and kids alike, couldn't keep still! It had been TOO long since we last saw Leyton. Juan Pablo explained Leyton's condition to the kids: how he had a catheter and couldn't be grabbed or hugged like normal. After explaining the official Los Patojos handshake, Juan Pablo went to retrieve Leyton and some of his family from outside. Once Juan Pablo removed his hands from Leyton's eyes the entire (ENTIRE!) school erupted in screams and yells and excitement which quickly turned into a unanimous chant of "Leyton! Leyton! Leyton!" at which point Leyton buried his head in his jacket out of embarrassment. Within 10 minutes all of Leyton's classmates were sitting around him and explaining what had been happening at Los Patojos while he was absent. In response, Leyton surprised us all by immediately wanting to show everyone his catheter and his scars and talk about his x-rays and time in the hospital. My words truly can't explain the emotion and excitement flowing through Los Patojos that afternoon, especially after Leyton had no fear in talking about his experience, his situation or his scars. Another volunteer and I later noted how we, more or less, had to pinch ourselves to keep us from exploding in tears in front of all the kids (we have to keep our "cool" you know). And at this point Leyton's situation truly became real. He made it this far and we want to keep going. We need to keep going.

Along with his catheter (which he will have until (and if) he can receive a transplant), Leyton is dependent on 3 medications to help his body cope, costing up to 3000Q or almost $400 a month. This is money that his family does not have, and also where we can come in to help him.

His medications are as follows: -Enalapril (5mg) tablets, -Etalpha (.25mg) tablets, -EPO or Erihtropajeting (2000i) Injections, -Tums

?We have come to understand that some or all of this medication is illegal in the states, so we are desperately seeking medication that might help him without interacting with what he is already taking. Please, if you know of anything or anyone that might be able to help us with this, ask them to contact Juan Pablo Romero Fuentes at jpromerofuentes@gmail.com .

A simple donation, a school penny collecting contest or a simple passing of this e-mail to a friend who may be able to help us and Leyton will be greatly appreciated.
Monetary donations can be sent by check (please put "Leyton Fund" in the memo to differentiate between other donations) to:


Rising Minds
15 Fox Run Drive
Newburyport, MA 01950

Monetary donations can also be made online through the Rising Minds website (risingminds.org ), however mailed checks are preferred.

Thank you all so much for your time in reading this. Los Patojos and all of our children are completely reliant on donations to help keep the school functioning and our students healthy. If you have any questions whatsoever regarding any of this information, please contact:

Juan Pablo Romero Fuentes at jpromerofuentes@gmail.com
Kyla Gallagher at risingminds.volunteer@gmail.com



3. DETAILS ON IMMIGRATION WORKSHOP AY SFAA/SLACA MEETINGS IN MERIDA

Expert Witness in Immigration and Political Asylum Cases

Thursday 8:00-9:30

LOUCKY, James (W Washington U), RODMAN, Debra (Randolph-Macon Coll) Social scientists can play a valuable role in providing knowledge of in-country conditions and relevant cultural, political, and psychological issues for immigration and political asylum cases. This workshop covers the essentials of expert witness consulting, as well as hands-on practice in preparation of affidavits, understanding key aspects of asylum procedures, and suggestions for dealing effectively with attorneys, applicants, and courtroom culture.

Facilitated by anthropologists and attorneys with long involvement in political asylum cases, the workshop will benefit novices and experienced witnesses alike. james.loucky@wwu.edu
Limited to 15 participant

Cost $15


4. EXPERT WITNESS NEEDED ON DISABLED IN GUATEMALA

My name is Atosa Morvarid, I am currently a 3rd year law student working in the Immigration Clinic at St. Thomas University School of Law. I was referred to you by Professor Brinton Lykes at Boston College. My partner and I have a Guatemalan client that is in removal proceedings and we are seeking your possible assistance and expertise. Specifically, our client has a physical disability (dwarfism) and illness, both of which limit him from working and carrying out other daily activities. We want to show that if he is forced to return to Guatemala, he will be harmed because of his disability. Essentially, we are trying to build an asylum case and are having a difficult time obtaining reliable reports and statistics on the above issue, as well as the current country conditions in Guatemala. In order to build a strong asylum case, we need to prove that conditions in Guatemala are so severe and unsafe that the United States should grant him asylum. We can provide you with more information if necessary, please let me know if there is any guidance that you can provide us regarding our client. Thank you for your time.

Kindly yours,
Atosa Morvarid and Anjie Koul Atosa Morvarid [atosam@hotmail.com]

5. KAQCHIQUEL SUMMER LANGUAGE PROGRAM IN ANTIGUA

Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Anthropology and the Program in Linguistics is happy to announce the 22 year of the Intensive Kaqchikel Language and Culture Course, Oxlajuj Aj. This course, conceived of as a co-learning experience, teaming Kaqchikel speakers as language instructors and culture brokers with non-Maya (usually US) students to explore, challenge and revise the received canons of Mayan studies, will run from June 21 through July 30th this year. The course begins and ends in Antigua, Guatemala, but includes stays in Tecpán (Iximche’) and Panajache’l, as well as shorter visits to smaller Kaqchikel communities. For more information, including a downloadable application form, please visit:

http://www.tulane.edu/~maxwell/oxlajuj.htm
or you may choose to e-mail one of the co-directors: Dr. Judith M. Maxwell, Tulane, maxwell@tulane.edu or Dr. Walter E. Little, SUNY-Albany, wlittle@albany.edu
--
Walter E. Little
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology
1400 Washington Avenue
University at Albany, SUNY
Albany, NY 12222



6. SUMMER FIELDSCHOOL IN XELA


Study the life and culture of the Highland Maya
Ethnographic Field School in western Guatemala

6 undergraduate credits in anthropology

May 25–July 8, 2010 (two days on-campus, six weeks abroad)

Maury Hutcheson, Ph.D. mhutcheson@vcu.edu

Program cost: $2,380 (includes roundtrip airfare) plus applicable VCU tuition[1]

Based in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, this six-week program will provide students with a comprehensive overview of Mayan indigenous life in Guatemala, past and present, including opportunities for individual and group research through participant observation, attendance at cultural events, lectures on selected topics, and excursions to museums and major archaeological sites, dating from the earliest days of the Olmec/Maya transition to the contact-era capitals that were toppled by the Spanish conquistadors.

Highland Guatemala provides an ideal setting in which to explore different topics such as cultural pluralism, religious conservation and change, local responses to globalization and cultural revitalization movements. Students will gain practical experience in a variety of ethnographic research techniques as well as the ethical dimension of anthropological fieldwork while exploring historical continuities and transformations in Mayan culture and religious practice, especially in response to economic globalization and tourism. Students live with Guatemalan families. Course instruction is in English, but incorporates individualized one-on-one tutoring in Spanish. The program is well suited for students in anthropology, international studies, history, and religious studies. Interethnic relations between the Maya and their non-indigenous Ladino neighbors will be a special focus of this year’s program.

The international program fee of $2,380 includes the following:

• Roundtrip airfare

• All accommodations

• All meals while living with Guatemalan families

• Study visits and cultural excursions

• Ground transportation

• On-site program director support

• Application fee and deposit

• International Student Identification Card
Registration deadline: March 2

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